Blog 3, Danube series.

The Wachau, Die Wachau, is an area of Austria you don’t want to miss. This part of the Danube is only 30 kilometers (19 miles) long, but it’s a historic and epicurean microcosm of Austria. Centuries of stone terracing enclose vineyards framed by the Melk and Gottweig Monasteries. Gunter and I—along with my sister Loretta, her husband John—disembarked at Krems and took a bus tour to Melk. Our tour group walked partway on a path along the Danube, where we experienced spectacular views of vineyards clinging to riverside hills and sprawling into lush valleys.

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The Benedictine Abbey Stift Melk, a UNESCO world heritage site that sits like a fortress on a high cliff, guards the western entrance of the Wachau region. Abbot Berthold Dietmayr began the construction the famous, baroque building during the 18th century. It took more than 30 years to build. A mighty church towers over numerous buildings and seven courtyards. It was quite the walk through the campus! And from the heights, the view of the countryside was stunning.

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In Melk, a monk looks out of each window

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As a writer, I was most impressed by the library, containing 100,000 volumes. The book bindings were designed to match the library decor. Because photos were not allowed, the following photo was “lifted” from the souvenir book, Die Wachau. More photos of Die Wachau can be viewed on Gerd Krauskopf’s photo gallery. 

Back on the ms/Ariana, we learned that two rivers, the Melk and Pielach, flow into the Danube at the foot of the cliff on which the Abbey is built. Archeological finds from the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages indicate that this site was a popular settlement choice. Later, the Romans built a small fort and lookout post that was probably set up where the bridge now crosses the Danube. Eventually, Slavic peasants from the East and South settled the area up to the mouth of the Enns River. The Slavic name Melk, meaning a “slow-moving stream,” comes from this time. In 1089 the monks arrived in Melk and since then, they have lived and worked in Melk without interruption. Melk is inseparably joined with the beginnings of Austria as a nation. Next stop: Vienna!